Health Check: When Do Adults Need to Be Immunised?

by Kristine Macartney and
Kristine Macartney
Kristine Macartney is a paediatrician specialising in infectious diseases. She is a medical graduate of the University of New South Wales, and gained much of her experience in the United States where she worked at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Her Doctorate of Medicine was on rotavirus infection, in particular the mucosal immune response to novel vaccine candidates. She was also a member of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and is interested in all aspects of vaccine preventable disease research. Associate Professor Macartney has a clinical appointment at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead as a Staff Specialist in Infectious Diseases and Microbiology and a conjoint academic appointment as Associate Professor in the Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health of the University of Sydney.
Melina Georgousakis
Melina Georgousakis
Dr Melina Georgousakis is a medical research scientist who joined NCIRS in 2010. Her research background is in the area of infectious disease and mucosal vaccine development. She completed her PhD at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, studying the bacterium group A streptococcus. She has published multiple papers in this field. Melina is interested in applying her knowledge and experience in vaccine design to public health research. She is especially interested in the hurdles associated with communicable disease and vaccination in developing countries. Melina is passionate about engaging the public in health and medical science. Melina recently completed her Masters of Public Health from The University of Sydney.
on Apr 17, 2014

A child receiving a vaccination.
Many adults missed out on vaccines that are routinely given to children today. Shutterstock

Most of us will receive the majority of our vaccinations in childhood. But Australian adults still die and become disabled from vaccine-preventable diseases. Immunisations are therefore an important preventive health measure at all stages of life.


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How to Critique a Research Article

by Sarah Vogel
Sarah Vogel
Sarah specialises in well researched articles in the field of health and medicine and has a BHlthSci (MRT).
on Apr 16, 2014
A female nursing student reading and critiquing journal/research articles.

If you've managed to get your hands on peer reviewed articles then you may wonder why its necessary for you to perform your own article critique – surely the article will be of good quality if it has made it through the peer review process? Unfortunately this is not always the case.


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Bullying in Nursing

by Lynda Lampert
Lynda Lampert
on Apr 15, 2014
A infant child suffering from a skin condition.

We've all seen it and looked the other way. Maybe we've even done it to another nurse after a bad day, or watched in silence as a colleague berated a newer nurse. Then there is the gossip. Bullying is rampant in nursing, and it makes a difficult job all the more stressful because of it.


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Fat and Fit? There's no Such Thing for Most People

by Amanda Salis
Amanda Salis
With a BSc (Hons) from the University of Western Australia and a PhD from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, Associate Professor Amanda Salis (nee Sainsbury) leads a research team at the University of Sydney's Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders that aims to help people to attain and maintain an optimum body weight and composition.
on Apr 15, 2014

A women puffed out after a lengthy run.
A small proportion of overweight and obese people are metabolically healthy but that doesn’t mean we should become complacent about aiming for a healthy weight. Shutterstock

The idea that people can be healthy at any weight has gained credence in recent years, despite widespread evidence that obesity creates health risks. While the idea is attractive, it’s also dangerous because it can lull people who need to lose weight now into a false sense of security.


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Transcultural Nursing in Australia

by Sarah Vogel
Sarah Vogel
Sarah specialises in well researched articles in the field of health and medicine and has a BHlthSci (MRT).
on Apr 14, 2014
A women holding a new born child.

Australia is a multicultural society. The 2011 Census revealed that almost a quarter of the population were born overseas, and 43.1 per cent of people have at least one overseas-born parent.


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What to Do When a Patient Refuses Assistance

by Lynda Lampert
Lynda Lampert
on Apr 11, 2014
A picture of a cross laying on a bible - some people will refuse treatment for religious reasons.

As nurses, we are taught to take every step necessary to save a life. In contrast, we are also trained to respect the patient’s wishes. Sometimes, these two tenets conflict, and this leaves the ethical nurse in a quandary as to how to proceed...


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