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How do Palliative Care Nurses Define their Roles When a Family Member is Terminally Ill?

CPDTime.
3m of CPD
As a nurse I always believed we could put up a wall when looking after patients, and that we wouldn't have to worry about them after our eight-hour shift. However, whether we are working in a general ward, palliative care or a hospice unit, all nurses will deal with death at some point.

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As a nurse I always believed we could put up a wall when looking after patients, and that we wouldn't have to worry about them after our eight-hour shift. Whether we are working in a general ward, palliative care or a hospice unit, all nurses will deal with death and the dying patient at some point in their nursing career. When I moved into palliative care and became a palliative care nurse, my emotions about my patients deepened as they become almost like family due to the multiple times that they were admitted into the Unit. Even though we were sad when their time came to pass away, I knew that it was another family that had to deal with the tragedy and grief that follows.

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    3m of CPD

Meet the educator

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Sandra Dash
Sandra Dash began her nursing career in 1993 in New South Wales working in trauma, orthopaedics and ICU. Sandra then spent the next 9 years working in the Northern Territory, NSW and Victoria with the Australian Defence Force. During this time she found her beginning in Nursing Education, teaching at both University and TAFE levels earning a Master’s of Health Science (Nursing Education). In 2010, Sandra moved to Queensland and began the most rewarding career in palliative care, through which she has not only cared for people at a distressing time in their life, but has also been able to continue her passion for education.
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58 reviews by Ausmed Learners
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JJ
Jennifer Johnston
17 Aug 2021
I believe this article raised a thought provoking view.
KT
Karen Taylor
27 Jun 2022
Great read
KF
Katie Foote
12 Oct 2020
Great read. This reinforces existing knowledge that it really is ok to take a back seat from being a nurse and take time to be a daughter.
AM
Amanda Marley
06 Jul 2020
Very relevant information.
CM
Chrissy Moyle
29 May 2022
Very interesting read
SH
Suzanne Higgins
06 May 2020
great resources
ET
ella Thomas
12 Apr 2022
I did not get any helpful information from this article. Thought it was just someone else’s story
RW
Renzhi Wang
24 Apr 2022
Registered Nurse
Interesting reading.
AD
Annie Dear
26 Aug 2021
clear and concise, relevant and informative
JN
Judith Nothdurft
12 Aug 2019
The reading was interesting and made me think nurses are human and deal with very real situation sometimes out of work.
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