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Maternal-Infant Health Beliefs and Infant Feeding Practices: The Perception and Experience of Immigrant Vietnamese Women




Many studies on the incidence of and factors associated with infant feeding practices among immigrant Vietnamese women can be cited. However there has been little systematic inquiry and documentation of these women's experience and perception of maternal, infant and family health beliefs and practices before and after immigration to Sydney. Their beliefs and practices are related to their social, cultural and economic environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the women's perceptions and lived experience of their health beliefs. It also compared infant feeding practices and how changes occurred through a process of adaptation following immigration to a new country.


Contents include

  • Aim of the study
  • Method
  • Findings
  • Discussion
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Author / Editor Biographies

Joh Chin Rossiter was born in Singapore. She completed her nursing training in Singapore and England. In 1968 she migrated to Australia with her husband and son. At present Joh Chin is a Lecturer at the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Western Sydney. Her main research interests are infant feeding practices among immigrant Vietnamese women and culture-specific education programs to promote breastfeeding among Vietnamese women in Sydney.

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